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End Neurofibromatosis with Ian Desmond

Please join Washington Nationals shortstop Ian Desmond during May which is Neurofibromatosis Awareness Month as he works to raise awareness and support research to end neurofibromatosis (NF). The disease causes tumors to grow along nerves in the body and effects roughly 1 in 3,000 births worldwide, yet it is not well known by the public and remains largely a mystery to the scientific community.

Help change that now by getting involved!

To join Ian's team in the fight against NF visit the Indiegogo campaign page linked below. In exchange for your generous contribution, you may receive various perks such as: T-shirts, signed items, or game tickets. Quantities are limited, but make sure to check back frequently as new perks will be added throughout the month.

Indiegogo Campaign

Proceeds from this fundraiser will benefit the Children's Tumor Foundation, a 501(c)3 charity with a four-star Charity Navigator rating. CTF is dedicated to improving the health and well-being of individuals and families affected by NF through research and outreach programs. For more information, visit CTF.org.

About the disease

Neurofibromatosis, or NF, is a set of distinct genetic disorders that causes tumors to grow along various types of nerves, and can also affect the development of non-nervous tissues such as bones and skin. NF affects more than 2 million people worldwide, making the disease more prevalent than cystic fibrosis, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and Huntington's Disease combined. The disease is found worldwide, affects sexes equally, and has no particular racial, geographic or ethnic distribution. Though many cases of NF are mild to moderate, the disease can, in some cases, lead to disfigurement; blindness; skeletal abnormalities; dermal, brain, and spinal tumors; loss of limbs; and malignancies. As a genetic disorder, it is commonly diagnosed in children and young adults.

Indiegogo Campaign