BOSTON -- On Saturday night, for the fourth time this season, the Red Sox were involved in a reviewed play -- but this time it ended in their favor.

Mike Lowell hit a shot off the top of the Green Monster in the second inning, and the play was originally ruled a double. But after a brief delay, umpires reviewed the video and called it a solo home run, giving the Red Sox a one-run lead over the Rangers, an advantage they'd never relinquish en route to an 8-1 victory.

"They called it a double, [and] they checked right away," said manager Terry Francona. "I felt good, because I know what I saw. It just took a couple of minutes to get to it."

"I don't care, if they get it right," Lowell said of his hit being reviewed. "I don't care if it's a double, if it's really a double. But if it's a double and it should be a homer, you're [mad]."

Lowell was optimistic that the play would be ruled in his favor, resulting in his ninth home run and 37th RBI of the season.

"When they went to check it, I wasn't concerned, because I knew they were going to get it right," he said. "I was pretty confident it was going to be a home run, just because when it kicks up a little, it's usually over that ... I don't know what it is, if it's a wood thing. So [Mark] Kotsay came out early, and he told me, 'You got it.' So I felt pretty good about that. But, yeah, I'll take it. I don't care if it goes over by four inches or 40 feet."

In the ninth inning on May 23, a ball hit by Mets catcher Omir Santos hit the top of the Green Monster and caromed onto the field. Initially ruled in play by third-base umpire Paul Nauert, the hit was reviewed and determined to be a two-run homer off Jonathan Papelbon, giving New York a 3-2 win.

The next day, a long drive over the Monster by Kevin Youkilis was called foul, and a review upheld the original ruling.

On Thursday, in Detroit, a drive by Jeff Larish that could have been a two-run homer was ruled a foul ball. A review of the video confirmed the correct call.

"Yeah, we didn't have any for, like, two years, and now it seems like it's a weekly thing," Lowell said. "But I actually really like the rule, either way. I know one went against us, but they're getting the call right, and that's all that we're looking for. I don't think that it's a knock on an umpire or anything like that, but sometimes, especially here at Fenway, when you look up and down the third-base line, the lights are in your way for the umpires. So it could be tricky. But I had a pretty good feeling when they went to review it that it was going to be in our favor."